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Are there any risks associated with contrast-enhanced mammography?

Contrast-enhanced mammography (CEM) is a newer imaging technique that uses a contrast agent to enhance the visibility of breast tissue, potentially improving the accuracy of breast cancer detection. As with any medical procedure, women may be concerned about the risks associated with CEM. In this article, we will discuss the potential risks associated with CEM.

CEM is a relatively safe procedure, and serious complications are rare. However, like any medical procedure, there are potential risks and side effects. The most common side effect of CEM is discomfort or pain during the injection of the contrast agent. This discomfort is typically mild and temporary, and can be managed with over-the-counter pain medication.

Less common side effects of CEM can include allergic reactions to the contrast agent, such as hives, itching, or difficulty breathing. These reactions are rare, but can be serious, and healthcare providers will monitor patients closely during the procedure to watch for signs of an allergic reaction.

There is also a small risk of radiation exposure associated with CEM. However, the amount of radiation exposure from CEM is very low, and is considered safe for most women. The benefits of early breast cancer detection through CEM screening typically outweigh the risks associated with radiation exposure.

In rare cases, CEM can cause an infection or damage to the tissue surrounding the injection site. These complications are very rare, and can typically be prevented with proper sterilization techniques and careful injection site selection.

It is important to note that the risks associated with CEM are typically very low, and the procedure is considered safe for most women. If you have concerns about the risks associated with CEM, it is important to discuss these concerns with your healthcare provider. They can provide information and guidance on the potential risks and benefits of the procedure, and help you make an informed decision about your breast cancer screening options.

In conclusion, CEM is a relatively safe procedure, and serious complications are rare. The most common side effect is temporary discomfort or pain during the injection of the contrast agent. Allergic reactions to the contrast agent and radiation exposure are also potential risks, but are very rare. Women should discuss any concerns or questions about the risks associated with CEM with their healthcare provider.


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